Sales Objections: Three words you must NEVER say!

The most important thing to remember in dealing with sales objections is that they almost always have a strong emotional component:  “Your rate is way too high…I had a bad experience in the past with your company…I don’t understand why I should have to sign a personal guarantee,” and so on.

So it’s important for you to take the emotion out of the conversation as deftly as possible. That’s why last week I wrote about pausing after the objection and the power this simple tactic offers you. Today I’ll share another tactic, eliminating specific words in your objection response that work against you.

Gregory at Medtronic 10-2010 CroppedLet’s begin by looking at the standard models for dealing with objections.  All of them begin with some statement from you of empathy and understanding. So for a price objection it might sound like,  “I can appreciate why this would concern you.  No one wants to pay more for something than what they feel it’s worth….” And so on. The idea is that you want the prospect to feel that you are being a consultative partner, willing to discuss his concerns, not an argumentative or defensive person who disagrees and disrespects the prospect’s feelings.

Here’s an example of what happened to me in a workshop I did last year on objection handling.  I used the price objection and asked each of the learners to give me an example of a response that showed empathy or understanding.  One of them said, “I can appreciate why you might THINK our prices are too high…”

Do you see what happened?  In effect, he was saying, “Your idea that our price is too high was a mistake on your part and now I’m going to set you straight.” There was no empathy at all, just the opening words to a fight.

More often than not, the learners are able to get through the empathy and understanding part, but then they destroy it with their next comment, like this: “But that’s because you aren’t considering how competitive that price is when compared to what other companies charge.”

“However, you have to factor in all the costs that support that price…”

“Nevertheless, when all factors are considered, you have to agree the price is fair and comparable to other providers.”

These three words, But, However, and Nevertheless, are emotional signals to the customer that say, “I pretended to see your point of view, but I’m actually discounting it and arguing with you anyway.”

To handle objections consistently well, you have to continue to empathize and explain your reasoning without appearing to be arguing with the customer, who must believe you are a thoughtful consultant trying to help.  Get rid of “But”, “However” and “Nevertheless.” Contrast these two sentences:

“Your point is well taken, but it fails to consider two other factors that are important.”

“Your point is well taken.  Let’s explore it further and see if we can come to an understanding.”

Which salesperson would you rather deal with?

The consultative salesperson does one thing others don’t, and you can do it too.

Think Like Your Customer!

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About Gregory LaMothe
I teach people how to sell things. I own the company ActionSystems. Visit my website at www.actionsystemstraining.com.

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